Clue Juice: One minute, nineteen seconds. “Clue Juice,” a reference to the South Park Hardly Boys episode in which two homoerotic detectives get “raging clues” and shoot “clue juice” when they’ve nearly solved a crime, reinforces this band’s proud degeneracy, which Mannequin Pussy wears like a badge. Beyond juvenilia, though, “Clue Juice” is a stellar grungy single, calling to mind Nirvana (a post-mulatto, albino, mosquito, libido homage). Originally appearing on Reeks of Effort Records’ compilation, Leisure Rules, with Dabice’s vocals higher-pitched, this LP version is more refined. Yes, “Clue Juice” from Mannequin Pussy’s Gypsy Pervert—refined, relatively. It returns to the crass hardcore tones of “Sneaky Nips,” simple and accelerated like early Agnostic Front. Featuring the most addictive chorus of Gypsy Pervert, “if that’s the way you want it, well then that’s the way it is,” Dabice sounds like a hostile genie granting a careful-what-you-wish-for wish to a soon-to-be ex.

Read the rest of our track-by-track review of Mannequin Pussy’s Gypsy Pervert.

(Source: Spotify)

There was no airtight methodology at work. I don’t know how to navigate Excel. I didn’t cross-reference sales numbers with word counts broken into columns marked ‘Club’, ‘Girls’, and ‘Childhood’. These may not be the thirty most influential rap albums released between January 1st, 2010 and August 31st, 2014. But my gut says they’re the best. The order was scrutinized, changed, then torn apart, but that’s beside the point. What follows are thirty records by twenty-four rappers that are marvels of either technical precision or creative vision—sometimes both. There are heartfelt tapes shaped by divorces and midlife crises; there are coldly emotionless arguments for gangsta rap’s relevancy fifteen years past its expiration date. If nothing else, this is irrefutable proof that rap is very, very alive.

There was no airtight methodology at work. I don’t know how to navigate Excel. I didn’t cross-reference sales numbers with word counts broken into columns marked ‘Club’, ‘Girls’, and ‘Childhood’. These may not be the thirty most influential rap albums released between January 1st, 2010 and August 31st, 2014. But my gut says they’re the best. The order was scrutinized, changed, then torn apart, but that’s beside the point. What follows are thirty records by twenty-four rappers that are marvels of either technical precision or creative vision—sometimes both. There are heartfelt tapes shaped by divorces and midlife crises; there are coldly emotionless arguments for gangsta rap’s relevancy fifteen years past its expiration date. If nothing else, this is irrefutable proof that rap is very, very alive.

While not much information has been released about Frank Ocean's follow up to 2012's Channel Orange, a few new details have emerged. Apparently, Ocean has been in the studio with Hot-Boy ("Niggas In Paris", Drake, Nicki Minaj) and Rodney Jerkins (Whitney Houston, Michael Jackson, Destiny’s Child) according to Billboard. In addition, Ocean is working with Happy Perez, Charlie Gambetta, and Kevin Ristro, who Ocean has collaborated with in the past.

While not much information has been released about Frank Ocean's follow up to 2012's Channel Orange, a few new details have emerged. Apparently, Ocean has been in the studio with Hot-Boy ("Niggas In Paris", Drake, Nicki Minaj) and Rodney Jerkins (Whitney Houston, Michael Jackson, Destiny’s Child) according to Billboard. In addition, Ocean is working with Happy Perez, Charlie Gambetta, and Kevin Ristro, who Ocean has collaborated with in the past.

Natalie Merins, who has been working with bands like Jackie-O Motherfucker and Ariel Pink’s Haunted Graffiti for quite some time, has finally gotten some notoriety for her own project, Weyes Blood. Her forthcoming record, The Innocents, looks to be an exceptional display of ethereal folk music. In anticipation, she’s shared a cut off the record titled “Some Winters”. The track features some incredibly moving vocals and sweeping piano lines. Listen to it above.